Harmless Insanity

In the “women’s communities,” transsexual existence is particularly threatening to white middle-class lesbian-feminists because it exposes not only the unrealiableness of the body as a source of their identities and politics, but also the fallacy of women’s universal experiences and oppressions. These valid criticisms against feminist identity politics have been made by women of color and working class women all along, and white middle-class women have traditionally dismissed them by arguing that they are patriarchal attempts to trivialize women’s oppression and bring down feminism as Dobkin did. The question of transsexual inclusion has pushed them to the position of having to defend the reliableness of such absurd body elements as chromosomes as the source of political affiliation as well as the universal differences between transsexual women and non-transsexual women, a nonsensical position fraught with many bizarre contradictions.

— Emi Koyama, Whose Feminism is it Anyway? [pdf]


I’ve thought a long time about what would be useful to the homeless. We need public toilets. Not filthy portapotties, but proper restrooms that are private and clean. We need safe places to sleep. Capsule hotels, which are found in Tokyo and some other places in the world, would be most excellent. The rooms should be very cheap, and I mean five bucks is too much. They should be subsidized, and there should be twice as many as there is a demand for them. They should be extremely secure, and you should be allowed to stay for as long as you want. We need showers. Safe, secure, single occupancy showers. Those are answers that would help people.

If cities want us off the streets, they should offer these alternatives. They would be cheap and easy.

Teen runaways who declare that they are without guardianship should not be treated as criminals, and should not be compelled to live a criminal life. They should be issued cards which confer the right to work upon them. Forget child labor laws. They have a perverse outcome, effectively forcing children to become prostitutes, drug dealers, and thieves. Emancipation should be an on-demand right for all children.

Get rid of laws which forbid sleep. Who are you kidding? Those laws contribute to the meth problem in this country. Those laws destroy lives.

You want to solve problems? Homeless people have problems, they are not the problem. Don’t treat them as something that needs a cure.

http://guide2homelessness.blogspot.com/2011/04/how-to-solve-homelessness.html

(Source: beowulfstits-archive)


Laws don’t protect anyone. So many of us who believe that fair housing laws, and anti-discrimination laws, and civil-rights laws, and voting laws and so forth, guarantee our freedom. What an illusion. What a flight into fantasy.

Laws are no stronger than their enforcers. And the same people who pass those laws are the same people who are responsible for enforcing the law. And if the people then who enforce the law no longer decide to do so, the laws then are of no value and have no power. Ultimately then, fairness rests, and the fairness of treatment rests, not in laws, but in the activities of people and in the attitude and consciousness of people.

You cannot put your faith in a white man’s law, and the laws enforced by whites. It is a silly faith that we have then, in laws. And for people in the 1970’s, and ’80s and ’90s, to still rest their freedom on the basis of laws, when the very history itself shows us that this cannot be done, we must question their sanity and what they have learned from the study of their history.

Back there, one hundred years ago, there was a federal law protecting voting rights in the South. Does this all sound vaguely familiar? This didn’t begin with the Freedom Riders of the 1960’s, we had those back there in the 1860’s and ’70s as well.

Dr. Amos N. Wilson on African history and how laws haven’t solved the problem of race.

Source: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lHPSuZYeCEY

(via disciplesofmalcolm)


anarcho-queer:

California Police Officer Kills Unarmed Homeless Man After Being Called A Bitch (Video Evidence)
An eyewitness recorded cellphone video of a Santa Ana police officer shoot and kill an unarmed 22-year-old homeless man at a shopping center earlier last week.
The witness, who wished to remain unidentified, was standing in the parking lot of the Harbor Place Shopping Center on South Harbor Boulevard around 3 p.m. Tuesday when he said he filmed a confrontation in front of Jugo’s La Tropicana between an officer, later identified as a 13-year veteran, and victim Hans Kevin Arellano.
“She exited her patrol car, gun drawn, and asked the gentlemen to get on the ground. The gentlemen didn’t get on the ground, he was still inside the restaurant. She asked again. The man then exited the restaurant, and as he was exiting the restaurant, he said, ‘What are you gonna do, b—-?’ About a second later, she shot him in the chest,” he said.
Arellano’s relatives were horrified when they viewed the video and believe the officer shouldn’t have used lethal force.
“I believe they should have Tased him, hit him with a baton, anything, but not shot him to kill him,” said Arellano’s niece, Yenniffer Moreno.
At a press conference Wednesday, Santa Ana interim Police Chief Carlos Rojas said Arellano, a convicted burglar, was “combative” when he initially got into altercations with various people in a McDonald’s parking lot.
When authorities arrived to the scene, Arellano ran to nearby juice bar, where the shooting unfolded.
“It was a confrontation. It wasn’t a casual conversation,” Rojas said.
Read More & Watch The Video
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anarcho-queer:

California Police Officer Kills Unarmed Homeless Man After Being Called A Bitch (Video Evidence)

An eyewitness recorded cellphone video of a Santa Ana police officer shoot and kill an unarmed 22-year-old homeless man at a shopping center earlier last week.

The witness, who wished to remain unidentified, was standing in the parking lot of the Harbor Place Shopping Center on South Harbor Boulevard around 3 p.m. Tuesday when he said he filmed a confrontation in front of Jugo’s La Tropicana between an officer, later identified as a 13-year veteran, and victim Hans Kevin Arellano.

She exited her patrol car, gun drawn, and asked the gentlemen to get on the ground. The gentlemen didn’t get on the ground, he was still inside the restaurant. She asked again. The man then exited the restaurant, and as he was exiting the restaurant, he said, ‘What are you gonna do, b—-?About a second later, she shot him in the chest,” he said.

Arellano’s relatives were horrified when they viewed the video and believe the officer shouldn’t have used lethal force.

I believe they should have Tased him, hit him with a baton, anything, but not shot him to kill him,” said Arellano’s niece, Yenniffer Moreno.

At a press conference Wednesday, Santa Ana interim Police Chief Carlos Rojas said Arellano, a convicted burglar, was “combative” when he initially got into altercations with various people in a McDonald’s parking lot.

When authorities arrived to the scene, Arellano ran to nearby juice bar, where the shooting unfolded.

It was a confrontation. It wasn’t a casual conversation,” Rojas said.

Read More & Watch The Video


thepeoplesrecord:

Indefinite solitary confinement violates human rights by Dr. Angela Davis
August 13, 2013

California prisoners are now in their 33rd day of a hunger strike; what they are risking their health and possibly their lives for is basic: an end to indefinite solitary confinement, a practice that most countries recognize as a violation of basic human rights.

Yet both Gov. Jerry Brown and California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation Secretary Jeffrey Beard are intransigent in their refusal to engage in honest negotiations with the prisoners.

Theirs is a system deep in crisis, mired in decades of lawsuits challenging numerous violations of the legal rights of prisoners that have yielded relatively little in terms of fundamental change. Headlines from the last month alone reveal the inability of current leadership to respect the most basic rights of California prisoners:

On Aug. 2, in spite of assertions by Brown that prison conditions have improved, the U.S. Supreme Court refused to delay a court order for California to release nearly 10,000 prisoners by year’s end to improve conditions in state prisons.

The three-judge panel overseeing the state’s prisons ruled that California must cut its prison population to deal with unconstitutional prison conditions such as substandard medical and mental health care caused by overcrowding. The CDCR is appealing this decision yet again.

On July 29, medical experts filed a report to a federal court monitor documenting substandard health care at Corcoran State Prison that represented “an ongoing serious risk of harm to patients” that results in preventable deaths. There was no comment from the Governor’s Office.

On July 7, the Center for Investigative Reporting broke a story about the fact that 148 women in state prisons received tubal ligations without required state approvals from 2006 to 2010. Former prisoners say doctors pressured women into being sterilized and targeted those whom prison officials deemed likely to commit crimes in the future. Brown offered no comment.

On July 1, California corrections officials reluctantly agreed to move up to 2,600 prisoners at risk of contracting valley fever out of Pleasant Valley and Avenal state prisons after being ordered to do so by U.S. District Judge Thelton Henderson.

The judge was critical of the department’s handling of valley fever outbreaks within its prisons, saying the death of 36 prisoners over the last six years “clearly demonstrated (the state’s) unwillingness to respond adequately to the health care needs of California’s inmate population.”

Again, no comment from the governor or the CDCR.

Instead of closing the prisons because of high health risks, Asian prisoners are being transferred to those prisons because of statistically lower “risks.”

Those with the power to make changes have dug in their heels, insisting that there is no crisis.

It comes as no surprise that we are asked to believe that the CDCR does not really hold prisoners in solitary confinement because they may have access to radios or televisions. We shouldn’t be surprised that the death of Billy Sell, a participant in the hunger strike for two weeks until the day before he died, is officially considered a death “unrelated to the hunger strike.”

We shouldn’t be shocked when Beard attempts to cover up the inhumanity of keeping prisoners in solitary for decades with no hope of release by calling the hunger strike “a gang power play.”

It’s important to remember that the United States stands alone in its extensive use of indefinite long-term solitary confinement; in Britain, solitary is banned for more than three weeks. In Pelican Bay, more than 500 people have been held in solitary for more than 10 years, and more than 78 have been held in solitary for more than 20 years.

There is a growing human rights movement across the country, led by prisoners and their families, that names this practice for what it is: torture. Some states like Illinois and Mississippi have closed or drastically downsized their solitary confinement units without any threat to institutional safety.

The California prisoners’ hunger strike is a courageous call for the California prison system to come out of the shadows and join a world in which the rights and dignity of every person is respected.

Source


Can you identify these dangerous douche bags? →

nudiemuse:

tierracita:

Last night around 9-10pm at SW 13th and Stark, my friend was assaulted by a group of men who punched her and hurled garbage at her, including a beer can, demanding that she lose weight. The photos of the assailants below were provided by a nearby apartment building.

If you can identify any of the people in the photos, please call the Portland police non-emergency line, 503-823-3333.

I’m furious. A group of white men beat and hurt my less-than-five-feet tall Latina friend because they felt she was disobeying an authority they thought they had over her body. Women need to be able to walk home at night (or anytime, anywhere) without fear of harassment and harm. Don’t let these men get away with it. If you have an idea of who they might be, report it.

Portland, let’s find these fuckers! The person attack is friends with a lot of my friends and this has a direct reflection on the way women of color and fat folks are treated here in the PNW. I’m not about calling the police on POC but the police can have these fuckers. If you have any portland followers, please reblog!

[Note—not my use of the word douchebag, it is the OP language]

Get them Portland.

And friends in Portland please be careful.